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Workshop: Cyber Security information sharing, accountability & regulation

June 29th 2018
Icon representing Workshop: Cyber Security information sharing, accountability & regulation
Workshop: Cyber Security information sharing, accountability & regulation

June 28th 2018
Icon representing Workshop: Cyber Security information sharing, accountability & regulation
Workshop: Cyber Security information sharing, accountability & regulation

June 28th 2018
 
 
 

Everything changes, Nothing changes

Plus ça change, plus c'est le même chose 
July 8th 2016
Plus ça change, plus c'est le même chose
At CSO Alliance we spend a lot of time thinking about the reporting of maritime crime incidents and how we can reduce underreporting. We tend to understand the reasons for why not all incidents are reported as being related to the cost both in terms of delays while an investigation is undertaken and the possibility of increased insurance rates. Bearing this in mind, it was with a sense of déjà vu this week that we came across an old MSC Circular from 1993[1]. In the circular it includes an excerpt from the United States Department of Energy Report – Piracy, the Threat to Tanker Traffic (Sept. 1992).

 

“Analysts agree that the incidents of piracy (and armed robbery at sea) is underreported by shipmasters and owners by at least a factor of two. Several reasons for this are proposed, including:

 

-       Fear that a successful act of piracy will reflect on the master’s competence;

-       Concern that such a report will embarrass the state in whose territorial waters the act occurred (the coastal state);

-       Concern that an investigation will disrupt the vessels schedule;

-       The possibility that shipowners’ insurance will increase.”

 

24 years after this report was published our industry still faces the same issues!

 

Part of our raison d’être at CSO Alliance has always been to reduce underreporting of maritime crime so CSOs have an accurate picture of the risks faced by their vessels and crew. Without this they can’t adequately mitigate the threat.

 

We’ve tackled this by creating the functionality on the platform for CSOs to report incidents anonymously so there’s no possibility of insurance increasing, vessel schedule being disrupted or the master’s competence being called into question. As for embarrassing the state in whose territorial waters the act occurred, perhaps those in which repeated incidents occur need to be embarrassed into action.

 

We know we don’t have all the answers to solving this problem, so we want to open up the floor to you. What could be done differently to make you more likely to report incidents? Please click here to join the conversation and leave your suggestions.


[1] MSC.Circ.622 22 June 1993