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Icon representing Workshop: Cyber Security information sharing, accountability & regulation
Workshop: Cyber Security information sharing, accountability & regulation

June 29th 2018
Icon representing Workshop: Cyber Security information sharing, accountability & regulation
Workshop: Cyber Security information sharing, accountability & regulation

June 28th 2018
Icon representing Workshop: Cyber Security information sharing, accountability & regulation
Workshop: Cyber Security information sharing, accountability & regulation

June 28th 2018
 
 
 

When Piracy is Just Armed Robbery Part 2

Op-Ed by Herbert I. Anyiam 
July 22nd 2014
Op-Ed by Herbert I. Anyiam
Suggested Solutions for Dealing with the Menace

In formulating an effective strategy to repress the surge in unlawful acts against the safety of maritime navigation in the Gulf of Guinea (GoG) it is vital that we first appreciate the exact nature of the problem from a legal perspective. This is based on simple logic because it is impossible to have an effective solution to a problem without establishing the nature of the problem. The necessary corollary for that reasoning is that for any security measure to be fruitful in combating crimes against vessels in GoG it must be based on a sound legal footing bearing in mind the rights and obligations of states within the various maritime zones under UNCLOS with issues relating to sovereignty and jurisdiction, and the various maritime boundary disputes which abound in the region due to the presence hydrocarbons.

Examples of maritime boundary disputes which could hinder collaborative efforts for maritime security measures in GoG include the acrimonious dispute over Bakassi peninsular between Nigeria and Cameroon; Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea over the island at the estuary of river Ntem; Equatorial Guinea and Gabon over Corisco Bay and Mbane Island; Ghana and Cote d’Ivoire over the Dzata-1 oil well near Cape Three points, as well as the potential maritime disputes between Liberia and its western and eastern neighbors following the recent discovery of oil in its waters. It is important for GoG states to set up necessary mechanisms for peaceful resolution of maritime boundary disputes as provided under UNCLOS,[10] as failure to do so may potentially derail maritime security initiatives in the region.

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Source: maritime-executive.com